Friday, November 30, 2012

Ghost Quilting Article in AQS Magazine

When I first posted blog entries in July and August of 2011 about what I call "ghost quilting," Iris Frank, a freelance writer from California, contacted me about collaborating with her on an article for American Quilter, the magazine of American Quilter's Society. Of course I was excited and thrilled at the opportunity to appear in this prestigious publication and we began working on the article. I made a similar project to the one she had seen, taking step photos along the way and writing cutlines for each. We tweaked and edited over several months and I sent work to Paducah for photography. What a happy trip I made to my mailbox this week when the January 2013 issue arrived at the end of November! Imagine my surprise when I saw the top line on the magazine cover: "Ghost Quilting--A Scare-Free Technique."
American Quilter January 2013
     When I first began doing these, I referred to them as "expanded flowers" or "extended pictures" or a similar uninteresting-sounding name. In that earlier blog, I said: "I call it Ghost Quilting. I start with a square or rectangle of printed fabric as the focus, then I add borders all around and imagine what is out off the edge of the focus fabric and complete the motifs with only stitching or with Neocolor II water soluble wax pastels (by Caran d'Ache, available at art supply stores) plus stitching. The focus fabric can be fused onto the center of a larger piece or borders can be sewn onto the center."
     To purchase a copy of the magazine from AQS, call 800-626-5420 now, or watch for it in mid-December at quilt, book, craft, and fabric stores.
     It is really an easy and fascinating technique. I have shown this to friends and many of us now look at each piece of fabric in the light of "I wonder how this would work with ghost quilting."

9 comments:

Julia said...

This is a great article. It's well written and easy to understand. Fun, fun, fun project!

jeanne Marklin said...

Congratulations Martha! It looks great, and I bet there will be lots of interest in the technique.

Martha said...

Thanks, Jeanne; I hope you will enjoy trying this. And thanks, Julia--you know you are my star pupil, don't you?

Moni said...

Hi Martha!
Moni here: I saw your article in the latest AQS magazine - hey I know here! Very well done. Definitely going to try this. Have you tried any other types of crayons? The ones you recommend are pretty spendy.

Martha said...

Hi, Moni, watch for special sales at Cheap Joe's for the crayons, and you can blend them, so you don't need the largest set. I have the 40 and could get by on fewer. As for others, I have used watercolor pencils some; I imagine anything you can heat-set will work. Not to be washed, though. It's good to hear from you. Happy climbing and skiing!
Martha

Moni said...

Have you used these crayons on dark material? I ended up buying some Portfolio crayons, which seems to work well EXCEPT on dark fabric. When I iron that to heat set - the color soaks through the fabric and dulls or disappears. It soaks through on the light colored fabric too, but seems to stay adequately bright.

Martha said...

Moni, I've used the Neocolor II crayons a bit on dark and the color seems stable after heat setting. It really lays on top of the fabric. But to dampen with a paint brush (like I do on light fabric) seems to dilute and lighten the color to the point of it disappearing. Hope this helps.
Martha

Moni said...

So, Martha, here's what I came up with. I am quite pleased.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/60431021@N04/8494242274/in/photostream

I will blog about this soon.

Martha said...

Moni, you should definitely be pleased! Your Iris piece is lovely, and you have taken the technique one step further with the addition of applique. Great work! I'll watch for it on your blog.